The Slow Burn of Filmmaking

As the calendar turned to 2014, I said to myself, “This year is going to be a wash. No big professional events. No new, exciting opportunities. Just hard work.”

I’ve been right so far. A quarter of the way into 2014, the biggest change has been an endeavor into publishing as a part-time developer for NetGalley.com.

Otherwise, as an artist and a filmmaker, I’m still working on the post production for two short films and two short documentaries, while bootstrapping feature and interactive opportunities with an eye on future revenue streams.

Film is nothing if it’s not hard work. And sometimes, like in 2014, that’s all it is.

Featured Friday: Seed & Spark - 

This week’s feature is not a video, it’s a platform. Seed & Spark understands that that the most valuable byproduct of crowdfunding isn’t the cash upfront, but the engaged audience after the film is finished. Watch their pitch, check out their platform, and see if you agree that this is the future of independent filmmaking.

Last week’s discussion on empty theaters seems especially relevant here.

Cinematographers, Nelson Carvajal’s brief examination of framing in Pawel Pawlikowski’s Ida is a must-read. The stills are gorgeous. 
~ü

Cinematographers, Nelson Carvajal’s brief examination of framing in Pawel Pawlikowski’s Ida is a must-read. The stills are gorgeous. 

The Animated Doc: 

I’ve decided there isn’t enough awareness of this clever and wonderful genre, so I’ve included a few of my favorite shorts that can be watched while you’re eating lunch (or perhaps dinner, or while you’re in bed, for those not in the US).

I’ve included Photograph of Jesus (7m, embedded in this post), for how it ties subject and content, An Eyeful of Sound (10m25s), for how it materializes the documentary’s premise as cinema, and My Mother’s Coat (6m) for it’s restraint and surprising use of film.

Working on a music video and felt the need to put this animated gif together from one of my favorites, Front 242’s Take One.
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Working on a music video and felt the need to put this animated gif together from one of my favorites, Front 242’s Take One.

somenotesonfilm ASKED:

Also, to add onto that last point, and as a counter to your Reggio example - I just recently came back tonight from trying to go see Go Down Death at Spectacle Theater. This is an undistributed film that's getting a limited release at a hole-in-the-wall microcinema in Brooklyn. The screening was sold out. I'm pretty sure all of the 5 screenings so far have been sold out or nearly sold out. There's 3 screenings left and I suspect those will be very well attended as well. So there's hope yet!


somenotesonfilm ASKED:

I've also been to plenty of nearly empty screenings in NYC, but doubt the cause is really lack of interest or rude audiences. There's just a glut of options. On any given night in NY you have the option of seeing half a dozen or more films that can't be seen ANYWHERE ELSE in the country - that's not counting bigger indie releases. Same market saturation problem all those think pieces last month mulled over. But I think I might prefer lots of mostly empty screenings over only 1 or 2 full ones.


newyorkliterarystyle ASKED:

I too have encountered empty/ fairly empty theaters in New York. A couple months ago for Visitors + for other movies like The Lunch Box, 12 o'clock boys. High ticket prices + sadly a rude/talkative art house crowd are really the cause in my opinion.